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George Carlin / Janis Ian and Billy Preston (1.1)
October 11, 1975
Leading Off:
This is the first episode of SNL ever. George Carlin is hosting.
Wolverines:
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This is the first sketch in the show's history and it's not really memorable. If you asked me "what was the first sketch in the show's history" before this, I wouldn't have guessed it to be this. I can see why this is first, because I suspect they wouldn't be thinking that the show would last forty seasons plus. Belushi following O'Donoghue to the floor after Mr. Mike passes out to the floor was very funny. I'll give it a bonus star for being the first. Chevy says the first LFNY ever.
Montage:
Nothing special, as I expected for the first episode or first season ever. I guess that the cast was put in the order they were hired. I have no clue.
Monologue:
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No "Welcome to SNL, I am your host George Carlin". George goes straight into his stand-up. I liked how he entered through the audience. Some hilarious stuff here about football and baseball.
New Dad:
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Dan Aykroyd makes his first SNL appearance! A bit dull for the first SNL commercial.
Court House:
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Garret's accent was pretty funny. Belushi and Aykroyd sit next to each other in the jury. Gilda's reaction to the letter was very funny.
(Guest Performance) - Andy Kaufman:
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The irony that Lorne cut out Billy Crystal's guest performance was very funny. I liked this upon several rewatches more than I did the first time. Admirable song selection.
Monologue:
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I like the idea of multiple monologues or stand-up performances. The dog and dead audience member lines were hilarious.
Victims of Shark Bite:
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Belushi's hand popping out the first time was very funny, but I didn't enjoy that Jane pulled it out the second time. It quickly died out with the audience and myself.
Jamitol:
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I'm really enjoying how short the sketches are so far. This was much better than the first commercial ever. The fact that O'Donoghue ended up being Chevy's wife was very funny.
Not a bad idea to have the host of the following week's episode appear to announce himself as the host.
Weekend Update:
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Best Jokes: Ford slogan (first good joke ever), prostitution stamps(!).

Kinda sloppy, but that was to be expected. Chevy wasn't looking at the right camera throughout most of this and lost himself in the jokes at a point. I liked how Update was short and to the point, running about three minutes (and another minute with the commercial). The arthritis commercial was pointless.

The Muppets:
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This disaster! They would do these ridiculous Muppet sketches throughout the season and boy, were they BRUTAL. These were absolutely terrible. The muppets didn't even look good in the first place. Horrible, horrible, but I liked how Lorne had lots of ideas to make this a very diverse television show. First DUD in show history for me.
Monologue:
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George asking the audience if he already told the joke earlier in the night was actually funny. Aside from that, I didn't find this all that hilarious compared to the other ones.
The Impossible Truth:
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Pretty weak film, but I liked how Israel/Georgia switched places.
The Bee Hospital:
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It wasn't funny, but it was short enough for me to like it. Belushi's reaction to his baby being a worker was funny.
The Academy of Better Careers:
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Very weak and boring sketch, not helped by Gilda’s error.
Valri Bromfield:
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This didn't really excite me. I wasn't in love with her performance, but I liked her energy a bit.
Show Us Your Guns:
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Pretty funny commercial, actually. All the people pointing their guns was funny.
Monologue:
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Carlin talking about Sunday and how Jesus was on the dashboard was very funny. Second best one. Carlin was really excellent in this.
Home Security:
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The audience hasn't been interested for the entire episode with all these sketches, but whenever Belushi appears, it catches their attention and got them interested. Aykroyd was outstanding in these types of sketches/commercials. It was getting pretty funny toward the end. What was with the band playing at the end interrupting Aykroyd?
Triple-Trac:
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The final sketch of the first episode. The twist at the end was pretty funny.
That's a rap for the first episode. George Carlin is by himself on the stage. Pretty weird to see that. It's strange to think that he's been on the stage for pretty much the entire episode by himself.
Episode MVP:
George Carlin
I'll give it to George for his monologue-work alone, but John Belushi had a very strong debut in the cast.
Final Thoughts:
George appeared exclusively in the monologue. I loved how there were sketches everywhere. Short sketches. Nothing I would fall asleep to. The sketches ranged from a minute to about four minutes long and I felt like there was a new sketch just about every minute, which I really liked. Good start to SNL even if it wasn't memorable and as funny as it would get in subsequent episodes, seasons and casts to come.

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